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Women’s March on Washington

Kristen Skinner, Webmaster

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On January 21, more than one million people from all over the world gathered in Washington, D.C. for a peaceful protest against President Trump.  Protesters were also hopeful to  end violence, raise awareness for the environment, LGBT people, all workers, people of color, people with disabilities, immigrants, and to promote rights for women.  Additionally, many sister marches took place around the globe.  

The marches helped people fight their fears and empower individuals globally.  Leah Mullen, a junior at OHS who attended the march, told the Buc Bulletin in a recent interview what participation in the march meant to her.  “Participating in the Women’s March was so important to me,” Mullen said. “I was grateful that I could speak my voice and stand up for not only myself, but for those who couldn’t be there.”  The Women’s March meant something different to everyone.

Mrs. Osetek, an elementary school teacher at Fitzhugh Park, also participated in the Women’s March and told the Buc Bulletin about her life-changing experience. “I went there focused to voice my concern on climate change. I left with an entirely different perspective on the importance of participating in our democratic system in a manner that stands up for the rights of all humanity,” Osetek explained.  “While climate change is real and it is our moral responsibility, especially as educators, to directly teach and engage students on the importance of protecting our earth, I left with a deeper understanding on many other important issues that I have sometimes taken for granted that encompass all of our human rights.” For several individuals this march served as an awakening and a call to their engagement in serious issues.

Many people believe this is the beginning of a huge movement that will continue to promote activism of rights and issues that people believe in for years to come. The marches were an act to circulate love and even protect families, in fear that family members could be deported.   Additionally, the Women’s March helped to unite individuals who had different reasons to protest and slightly altered views on what equality means to them.  The marches served as a reminder that as a nation, we stand together.  In the United States, no one fights alone.

Equality means something different to everyone.  Some people feel more equal and fortunate than others.  According to Osetek, “equality means many things revolving around protecting human rights,”and “making sure that the public education system is protected and that all children have access to a high-quality education and the equal chance to achieve the American Dream and “rise to greatness” in whatever capacity.”  Everyone deserves an equal chance to follow their dreams and find what makes them feel happy to be alive, especially in a country that has achieved so much over time.  And for these reasons, wonderful events such as the Women’s March have begun to take place.

The Women’s March on Washington, along with its sister marches, created a great amount of awareness for a number of concerns regarding the rights and equality of all people.  

It opened the eyes of several individuals to how many people struggle on a daily basis, based on the freedoms that have been pushed out from under them.  Osetek expressed, “I am ashamed that it took going to this march to open my eyes to the responsibility that I have as a citizen of our country.”  She now sees the urgency, “to be proactive regarding matters that affect other human beings who face challenges that once seemed so far removed.”  She is certainly not the only person who has been left with these emotions.  Now the question left on the minds of many is: “where do we go from here?”  

The energy and excitement after this march is not something that will go away.

People have created a mass public resistance that cannot be ignored. Several individuals have already began to take action and have written to their Senators about what matters most to them and how they will continue to fight for it.  Others have started to plan for future marches.  There are numerous ways people are starting to take part in what they care most about.  People have hope, realizing this is reality, this is history.  Now is the time for all to become involved.  March on!

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Women’s March on Washington